Jack London Books in Order

The Jack London books have become so popular over the years that generation after generation, people keep going back to them.

If you're just starting with it and want a reading list, you're in luck. Here we list out all the Jack London books in order; keeping in mind various factors like the publication year, reviews, its popularity among readers, etc.

It’s always a good idea to read such book titles in sequence so that you don't miss out on the story plot and its discussions in the book clubs.

Publication Order of Dogs of the Islands Books

Jerry of the Islands

London, Jack 1917

The story of Irish Terrier that went to sea, written by the author while stretched out on Waikiki Beach. Jack London's tale of adventure on the South Seas includes a foreword by the author, in which he says, "I hope I have given some assurance that the adventures of my dog hero in this novel are real adventures in a very real cannibal world.

" "Not until Mister Haggin abruptly picked him up under one arm and stepped into the sternsheets of the waiting whaleboat, did Jerry dream that anything untoward was to happen to him. Mister Haggin was Jerry's beloved master, and had been his beloved master for the six months of Jerry's life.

Jerry did not know Mister Haggin as "master," for "master" had no place in Jerry's vocabulary, Jerry being a smooth-coated, golden-sorrel Irish terrier." Jack London (1876-1916), an American novelist and short-story writer whose works deal romantically with elemental struggles for survival.

At his peak, he was the highest paid and the most popular of all living writers. Because of early financial difficulties, he was largely self educated past grammar school. London draws heavily on his life experiences in his writing. He spent time in the Klondike during the Gold Rush and at various times was an oyster pirate, a seaman, a sealer, and a hobo.

His first work was published in 1898. From there he went on to write such American classics as Call of the Wild, Sea Wolf, and White Fang.

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Michael Brother of Jerry

London, Jack 1917
Dag Daughtry was a steward on the Makambo who should have known better and who would have known better and done better had he not been fascinated by his own particular and peculiar reputation. (Excerpt) Read More

Publication Order of Standalone Novels

A Daughter of the Snows

London, Jack 1902
Frona Welse, Jack London's feminine ideal, returns to the desolate north of Canada and meets Vance Corliss. An adventure novel of the first order. This publication from Boomer Books is specially designed and typeset for comfortable reading. Read More

Burning Daylight

London, Jack 1902

Jack London was an American author who wrote some of the most famous novels of the early 20th century. London wrote on a variety of topics and is still one of the most read authors today. Many of his works were set during the Klondike Gold Rush, and his most popular titles are The Call of the Wild, White Fang, and The Sea-Wolf.

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The Kempton-Wace Letters ..

1876-1916, London Jack 1903

Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact.

Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

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The Sea-Wolf

Jack London 1904

Hailed by critics as one of the greatest sea stories ever written, this rousing adventure offers a fascinating combination of gritty realism and sublime lyricism in its portrayal of an elemental conflict. Jack London began his career at sea, and his shipboard experiences imbue The Sea-Wolf with flavorful authenticity.

In the story, the gentleman narrator, Humphrey Van Weyden, is pitted against an amoral sea captain, Wolf Larsen, in a clash of idealism with materialism. The novel begins when Van Weyden is swept overboard into San Francisco Bay, and plucked from the sea by Larsen's seal-hunting vessel, the Ghost.

Pressed into service as a cabin boy by the ruthless captain, Van Weyden becomes an unwilling participant in a brutal shipboard drama. Larsen's increasingly violent abuse of the crew fuels a mounting tension that ultimately boils into mutiny, shipwreck, and a desperate confrontation.

Read and loved around the world, this 1904 maritime classic has influenced such writers as Hemingway, Orwell, and Kerouac.

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The Game

London, Jack 1905
The Game is a 1905 novel by Jack London about a twenty year-old boxer Joe, who meets his death in the ring. London was a sports reporter for the Oakland Herald and based the novel on his personal observations. Read More

White Fang

Jack London 1906

When White Fang was first published in 1906, Jack London was well on his way to becoming one of the most famous, popular, and highly paid writers in the world. White Fang stands out as one of his finest achievements, a spellbinding novel of life in the northern wilds.

In gripping detail, London bares the savage realities of the battle for survival among all species in a harsh, unyielding environment. White Fang is part wolf, part dog, a ferocious and magnificent creature through whose experiences we see and feel essential rhythms and patterns of life in the animal kingdom and among mankind as well.

It is, above all, a novel that keenly observes the extraordinary working of one of nature's greatest gifts to its creatures: the power to adapt. Focusing on this wondrous process, London created in White Fang a classic adventure story as fresh and appealing for today's audiences as for those who made him among the bestselling novelists of his day.

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Before Adam

London, Jack 1906

Before Adam is a novel by Jack London, serialized in 1906 and 1907 in Everybody's Magazine. It is the story of a boy who dreams he lives the life of an early hominid Australopithecine. The story offers an early view of human evolution. The majority of the story is told through the eyes of the boy's hominid alter ego, one of the Cave People.

In addition to the Cave People, there are the more advanced Fire People, and the more animal-like Tree People. Other characters include the hominid's father, a love interest, and Red-Eye, a fierce "atavism" that perpetually terrorizes the Cave People.

A sabre-cat also plays a role in the story.

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Martin Eden

London, Jack 1909
MARTIN EDEN By JACK LONDON - (Fine Print Edition)Publication date 1909 Read More

Theft

London, Jack 1910

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

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The Abysmal Brute

London, Jack 1911
Jack London's tale of the corruption of prize fighting -- and the one young fighter who dared to stand up against it! Read More

Hearts of Three

London, Jack 1911

Francis Morgan, a wealthy heir of industrialist and Wall Street maven Richard Henry Morgan, is a jaded young New Yorker. When his father's business partner Thomas Regan suggests that Francis take a holiday in Central America, ostensibly to search for the treasure of the Morgans' legendary ancestor, Francis thinks it's a splendid idea.

But he never suspects what adventures await across the border - a surprising meeting with a distant relative, imprisonment on a murder charge, a daring escape, a perilous journey through the Cordilleras following an ancient Mayan prophecy, the Valley of Lost Souls with its mystic queen, fantastical treasures and, of course, the love of a beautiful stranger.

Meanwhile, back in New York, a cunning enemy is positioning himself to destroy the Morgan fortune. Francis must get back in time to thwart the takeover and save his family's business.

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Smoke Bellew

London, Jack 1912
An unabridged edition, to include: The Taste of the Meat - The Stampede to Squaw Creek - Shorty Dreams - The Man on the Other Bank - The Race for Number One Read More

The Valley of the Moon

London, Jack 1913

You hear me, Saxon? Come on along. What if it is the Bricklayers? I'll have gentlemen friends there, and so'll you. The Al Vista band'll be along, an' you know it plays heavenly. An' you just love dancin'- Twenty feet away, a stout, elderly woman interrupted the girl's persuasions.

The elderly woman's back was turned, and the back-loose, bulging, and misshapen-began a convulsive heaving. "Gawd!" she cried out. "O Gawd!"

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The Star Rover

London, Jack 1914

The Star Rover is the story of San Quentin death-row inmate Darrell Standing, who escapes the horror of prison life—and long stretches in a straitjacket—by withdrawing into vivid dreams of past lives, including incarnations as a French nobleman and an Englishman in medieval Korea.

Based on the life and imprisonment of Jack London’s friend Ed Morrell, this is one of the author’s most complex and original works. As Lorenzo Carcaterra argues in his Introduction, The Star Rover is “written with energy and force, brilliantly marching between the netherworlds of brutality and beauty.

”This Modern Library Paperback Classic is set from the text of the first American edition, published in 1915.

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The Mutiny of the Elsinore

London, Jack 1914
Written at the height of his career, this is considered one of Jack London's finest novels. Read More

Daughters of the Rich

Jack London 1915
Included is a chronological Bibliography of London's Plays compiled by James E. Sisson. Read More

The Little Lady of the Big House

Jack, London. 1916

A triangle romance provides the basis for a questioning of the meaning of masculinity, as well as an examination of agribusiness in California. Jack London said of this novel: "It is all sex from start to finish -- in which no sexual adventure is actually achieved or comes within a million miles of being achieved, and in which, nevertheless, is all the guts of sex, coupled with strength.

"

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The Assassination Bureau, Ltd.

London, Jack 1963

London’s suspense thriller focuses on the fine distinction between state- justified murder and criminal violence in the Assassination Bureau—an organization whose mandate is to rid the state of all its enemies.For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world.

With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

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The Lodger

London, Jack 2015

But appearances were not only deceitful, they were more than usually deceitful with regard to these unfortunate people. In spite of their good furniture—that substantial outward sign of respectability which is the last thing which wise folk who fall into trouble try to dispose of—they were almost at the end of their tether.

Already they had learnt to go hungry, and they were beginning to learn to go cold. Tobacco, the last thing the sober man foregoes among his comforts, had been given up some time ago by Bunting. And even Mrs. Bunting—prim, prudent, careful woman as she was in her way—had realised what this must mean to him.

So well, indeed, had she understood that some days back she had crept out and bought him a packet of Virginia.

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Publication Order of Short Stories/Novellas

The Wisdom Of The Trail

Jack London 1899

The Wisdom of the Trail is a book written by Jack London. It is widely considered to be one of the top 100 greatest books of all time. This great novel will surely attract a whole new generation of readers. For many, The Wisdom of the Trail is required reading for various courses and curriculums.

And for others who simply enjoy reading timeless pieces of classic literature, this gem by Jack London is highly recommended. Published by Quill Pen Classics and beautifully produced, The Wisdom of the Trail would make an ideal gift and it should be a part of everyone's personal library.

Read More

The God of His Fathers

London, Jack 1901
First published in 1906. Read More

The Death of Ligoun

London, Jack 1902

The Death of Ligoun is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

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To Build a Fire

London, Jack 1903
TO BUILD A FIRE is one of Jack London's most beloved short stories. A heartbreaking tale set in the vast wintry landscape of the North, it endures as one of the greatest adventures ever written. Read More

The Shadow and the Flash

London, Jack 1903
This surprising sci-fi tale by the author of The Call of the Wild demonstrates why Jack London is an undisputed master of the short story. Illustrations by multitalented author/artist Stan Timmons. Read More

How I Became a Socialist

London, Jack 1903

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

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Demetrios Contos

London, Jack 1903

Demetrios Contos is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

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The Call of the Wild and Typhoon

London, Jack 1903
Reader's Digest: Best Loved Books for young Readers The Call of the Wild Jack London Read More

What Life Means to Me

London, Jack 1905

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

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Love of Life

London, Jack 1905
First published in 1913. Read More

The Enemy of All the World

London, Jack 1907

The Enemy of All the World is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

Read More

Flush of Gold

London, Jack 1907

Flush of Gold is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

On July 12, 1897, London (age 21) and his sister's husband Captain Shepard sailed to join the Klondike Gold Rush. This was the setting for some of his first successful stories. London's time in the Klondike, however, was detrimental to his health. Like so many other men who were malnourished in the goldfields, London developed scurvy.

His gums became swollen, leading to the loss of his four front teeth. A constant gnawing pain affected his hip and leg muscles, and his face was stricken with marks that always reminded him of the struggles he faced in the Klondike. Father William Judge, "The Saint of Dawson," had a facility in Dawson that provided shelter, food and any available medicine to London and others.

His struggles there inspired London's short story, "To Build a Fire" (1902, revised in 1908), which many critics assess as his best. His landlords in Dawson were mining engineers Marshall Latham Bond and Louis Whitford Bond, educated at Yale and Stanford.

The brothers' father, Judge Hiram Bond, was a wealthy mining investor. The Bonds, especially Hiram, were active Republicans. Marshall Bond's diary mentions friendly sparring with London on political issues as a camp pastime.

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The Heathen

London, Jack 1908

The Heathen is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

On July 12, 1897, London (age 21) and his sister's husband Captain Shepard sailed to join the Klondike Gold Rush. This was the setting for some of his first successful stories. London's time in the Klondike, however, was detrimental to his health. Like so many other men who were malnourished in the goldfields, London developed scurvy.

His gums became swollen, leading to the loss of his four front teeth. A constant gnawing pain affected his hip and leg muscles, and his face was stricken with marks that always reminded him of the struggles he faced in the Klondike. Father William Judge, "The Saint of Dawson," had a facility in Dawson that provided shelter, food and any available medicine to London and others.

His struggles there inspired London's short story, "To Build a Fire" (1902, revised in 1908), which many critics assess as his best. His landlords in Dawson were mining engineers Marshall Latham Bond and Louis Whitford Bond, educated at Yale and Stanford.

The brothers' father, Judge Hiram Bond, was a wealthy mining investor. The Bonds, especially Hiram, were active Republicans. Marshall Bond's diary mentions friendly sparring with London on political issues as a camp pastime. London left Oakland with a social conscience and socialist leanings; he returned to become an activist for socialism.

He concluded that his only hope of escaping the work "trap" was to get an education and "sell his brains". He saw his writing as a business, his ticket out of poverty, and, he hoped, a means of beating the wealthy at their own game. On returning to California in 1898, London began working deliberately to get published, a struggle described in his novel, Martin Eden (serialized in 1908, published in 1909).

His first published story since high school was "To the Man On Trail", which has frequently been collected in anthologies. When The Overland Monthly offered him only five dollars for it—and was slow paying—London came close to abandoning his writing career.

In his words, "literally and literarily I was saved" when The Black Cat accepted his story "A Thousand Deaths", and paid him $40—the "first money I ever received for a story." London began his writing career just as new printing technologies enabled lower-cost production of magazines.

This resulted in a boom in popular magazines aimed at a wide public and a strong market for short fiction. In 1900, he made $2,500 in writing, about $71,000 in today's currency. Among the works he sold to magazines was a short story known as either "Diable" (1902) or "Bâtard" (1904), in two editions of the same basic story; London received $141.

25 for this story on May 27, 1902. In the text, a cruel French Canadian brutalizes his dog, and the dog retaliates and kills the man. London told some of his critics that man's actions are the main cause of the behavior of their animals, and he would show this in another story, The Call of the Wild.

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The Taste of the Meat

London, Jack 1910
The Taste of The Meat Read More

The Eternity of Forms

London, Jack 1910

The Eternity of Forms is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

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A Daughter of the Aurora/A Piece of Steak

Education, Pearson 1911
Retold at an easily accessible reading level, AGS Classics Short Stories is a collection of 150 stories that provide a friendly introduction to classics literature. Read More

The Scarlet Plague

London, Jack 1912

Jack London’s plague novel, in which the world’s population has been reduced to a few scattered bands of primitive scavengers, has influenced subsequent science-fiction apocalypses and dystopias — from George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty Four to the movies Road Warrior and Idiocracy.

Outside the ruins of San Francisco, a former UC Berkeley professor of literature recounts the chilling sequence of events which led to his current lowly state — a gruesome pandemic which killed nearly every living soul on the planet, in a matter of days.

Modern civilization tottered and fell, and a new race of barbarians — the western world's brutalized workers — assumed power everywhere.Over the space of a few decades, all learning has been lost. Unlike the professor on Gilligan's Island, the narrator is the least useful member of a thriving tribe, whose younger generation (who boast names like Hoo-Hoo and Har-Lip) are mostly descended from a the tribe's brutish founder.

He was known only by the title of his former occupation, so the tribe's name is: Chauffeur.A bleak, at times darkly humorous glimpse into the future by an author best known for red-blooded adventure yarns set in the Klondike Gold Rush.

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The Jacket

London, Jack 1914
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery. Read More

At the Rainbow's End

London, Jack 1914

At the Rainbow's End is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

On July 12, 1897, London (age 21) and his sister's husband Captain Shepard sailed to join the Klondike Gold Rush. This was the setting for some of his first successful stories. London's time in the Klondike, however, was detrimental to his health. Like so many other men who were malnourished in the goldfields, London developed scurvy.

His gums became swollen, leading to the loss of his four front teeth. A constant gnawing pain affected his hip and leg muscles, and his face was stricken with marks that always reminded him of the struggles he faced in the Klondike. Father William Judge, "The Saint of Dawson," had a facility in Dawson that provided shelter, food and any available medicine to London and others.

His struggles there inspired London's short story, "To Build a Fire" (1902, revised in 1908), which many critics assess as his best. His landlords in Dawson were mining engineers Marshall Latham Bond and Louis Whitford Bond, educated at Yale and Stanford.

The brothers' father, Judge Hiram Bond, was a wealthy mining investor. The Bonds, especially Hiram, were active Republicans. Marshall Bond's diary mentions friendly sparring with London on political issues as a camp pastime. London left Oakland with a social conscience and socialist leanings; he returned to become an activist for socialism.

He concluded that his only hope of escaping the work "trap" was to get an education and "sell his brains". He saw his writing as a business, his ticket out of poverty, and, he hoped, a means of beating the wealthy at their own game. On returning to California in 1898, London began working deliberately to get published, a struggle described in his novel, Martin Eden (serialized in 1908, published in 1909).

His first published story since high school was "To the Man On Trail", which has frequently been collected in anthologies. When The Overland Monthly offered him only five dollars for it—and was slow paying—London came close to abandoning his writing career.

In his words, "literally and literarily I was saved" when The Black Cat accepted his story "A Thousand Deaths", and paid him $40—the "first money I ever received for a story." London began his writing career just as new printing technologies enabled lower-cost production of magazines.

This resulted in a boom in popular magazines aimed at a wide public and a strong market for short fiction. In 1900, he made $2,500 in writing, about $71,000 in today's currency. Among the works he sold to magazines was a short story known as either "Diable" (1902) or "Bâtard" (1904), in two editions of the same basic story; London received $141.

25 for this story on May 27, 1902. In the text, a cruel French Canadian brutalizes his dog, and the dog retaliates and kills the man. London told some of his critics that man's actions are the main cause of the behavior of their animals, and he would show this in another story, The Call of the Wild.

Read More

When Alice Told Her Soul

Jack London 1916

When Alice Told Her Soul is a book written by Jack London. It is widely considered to be one of the top 100 greatest books of all time. This great novel will surely attract a whole new generation of readers. For many, When Alice Told Her Soul is required reading for various courses and curriculums.

And for others who simply enjoy reading timeless pieces of classic literature, this gem by Jack London is highly recommended. Published by Quill Pen Classics and beautifully produced, When Alice Told Her Soul would make an ideal gift and it should be a part of everyone's personal library.

Read More

Curious Fragments

London, Jack 1986
Book by London, Jack, Walker, Dale L. Read More

The League of the Old Men

London, Jack 2004

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

Read More

The Story of Keesh

Jack London 2008
This story recounts the legend of Keesh, an Eskimo boy who used "brains not brawn" to defeat a powerful polar bear and save his people from starvation. Read More

The Chinago

Jack London 2008
Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork. Read More

To the Man on the Trail

Jack London 2008

To the Man on the Trail is a book written by Jack London. It is widely considered to be one of the top 100 greatest books of all time. This great novel will surely attract a whole new generation of readers. For many, To the Man on the Trail is required reading for various courses and curriculums.

And for others who simply enjoy reading timeless pieces of classic literature, this gem by Jack London is highly recommended. Published by Quill Pen Classics and beautifully produced, To the Man on the Trail would make an ideal gift and it should be a part of everyone's personal library.

Read More

Bulls

London, Jack 2013

Bulls is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

Read More

Confession

London, Jack 2013

Confession is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

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The Red One

Jack, London, 2014
Features the haunting title novella, well worth comparing to Joseph Conrad's "Heart of Darkness." Read More

The Men of the Forty Mile

Jack London 2014

Sometimes a man's pride paints them into a corner. The men of Forty Mile watch as two of their own are set to duel, each feeling they have suffered at the hands of the other. Malamute Kid hates to see them kill each other, he wasn't even sure they really wanted to, but perhaps he could find a way to help the men save face in the tough days of winter.

Will one or both men die? Can old friends make a return to friendship? A classic story from the mind of Jack London. Narrated by Glenn Hascall.

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Hoboes That Pass in the Night

London, Jack 2014

Hoboes that Pass in the Night is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

On July 12, 1897, London (age 21) and his sister's husband Captain Shepard sailed to join the Klondike Gold Rush. This was the setting for some of his first successful stories. London's time in the Klondike, however, was detrimental to his health. Like so many other men who were malnourished in the goldfields, London developed scurvy.

His gums became swollen, leading to the loss of his four front teeth. A constant gnawing pain affected his hip and leg muscles, and his face was stricken with marks that always reminded him of the struggles he faced in the Klondike. Father William Judge, "The Saint of Dawson," had a facility in Dawson that provided shelter, food and any available medicine to London and others.

His struggles there inspired London's short story, "To Build a Fire" (1902, revised in 1908), which many critics assess as his best. His landlords in Dawson were mining engineers Marshall Latham Bond and Louis Whitford Bond, educated at Yale and Stanford.

The brothers' father, Judge Hiram Bond, was a wealthy mining investor. The Bonds, especially Hiram, were active Republicans. Marshall Bond's diary mentions friendly sparring with London on political issues as a camp pastime.

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The Fuzziness of Hoockla-Heen

London, Jack 2014

The "Fuzziness" of Hoockla-Heen is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

On July 12, 1897, London (age 21) and his sister's husband Captain Shepard sailed to join the Klondike Gold Rush. This was the setting for some of his first successful stories. London's time in the Klondike, however, was detrimental to his health. Like so many other men who were malnourished in the goldfields, London developed scurvy.

His gums became swollen, leading to the loss of his four front teeth. A constant gnawing pain affected his hip and leg muscles, and his face was stricken with marks that always reminded him of the struggles he faced in the Klondike. Father William Judge, "The Saint of Dawson," had a facility in Dawson that provided shelter, food and any available medicine to London and others.

His struggles there inspired London's short story, "To Build a Fire" (1902, revised in 1908), which many critics assess as his best. His landlords in Dawson were mining engineers Marshall Latham Bond and Louis Whitford Bond, educated at Yale and Stanford.

The brothers' father, Judge Hiram Bond, was a wealthy mining investor. The Bonds, especially Hiram, were active Republicans. Marshall Bond's diary mentions friendly sparring with London on political issues as a camp pastime. London left Oakland with a social conscience and socialist leanings; he returned to become an activist for socialism.

He concluded that his only hope of escaping the work "trap" was to get an education and "sell his brains". He saw his writing as a business, his ticket out of poverty, and, he hoped, a means of beating the wealthy at their own game. On returning to California in 1898, London began working deliberately to get published, a struggle described in his novel, Martin Eden (serialized in 1908, published in 1909).

His first published story since high school was "To the Man On Trail", which has frequently been collected in anthologies. When The Overland Monthly offered him only five dollars for it—and was slow paying—London came close to abandoning his writing career.

In his words, "literally and literarily I was saved" when The Black Cat accepted his story "A Thousand Deaths", and paid him $40—the "first money I ever received for a story." London began his writing career just as new printing technologies enabled lower-cost production of magazines.

This resulted in a boom in popular magazines aimed at a wide public and a strong market for short fiction. In 1900, he made $2,500 in writing, about $71,000 in today's currency. Among the works he sold to magazines was a short story known as either "Diable" (1902) or "Bâtard" (1904), in two editions of the same basic story; London received $141.

25 for this story on May 27, 1902. In the text, a cruel French Canadian brutalizes his dog, and the dog retaliates and kills the man. London told some of his critics that man's actions are the main cause of the behavior of their animals, and he would show this in another story, The Call of the Wild.

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The First Poet

London, Jack 2014

The First Poet is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

On July 12, 1897, London (age 21) and his sister's husband Captain Shepard sailed to join the Klondike Gold Rush. This was the setting for some of his first successful stories. London's time in the Klondike, however, was detrimental to his health. Like so many other men who were malnourished in the goldfields, London developed scurvy.

His gums became swollen, leading to the loss of his four front teeth. A constant gnawing pain affected his hip and leg muscles, and his face was stricken with marks that always reminded him of the struggles he faced in the Klondike. Father William Judge, "The Saint of Dawson," had a facility in Dawson that provided shelter, food and any available medicine to London and others.

His struggles there inspired London's short story, "To Build a Fire" (1902, revised in 1908), which many critics assess as his best. His landlords in Dawson were mining engineers Marshall Latham Bond and Louis Whitford Bond, educated at Yale and Stanford.

The brothers' father, Judge Hiram Bond, was a wealthy mining investor. The Bonds, especially Hiram, were active Republicans. Marshall Bond's diary mentions friendly sparring with London on political issues as a camp pastime. London left Oakland with a social conscience and socialist leanings; he returned to become an activist for socialism.

He concluded that his only hope of escaping the work "trap" was to get an education and "sell his brains". He saw his writing as a business, his ticket out of poverty, and, he hoped, a means of beating the wealthy at their own game. On returning to California in 1898, London began working deliberately to get published, a struggle described in his novel, Martin Eden (serialized in 1908, published in 1909).

His first published story since high school was "To the Man On Trail", which has frequently been collected in anthologies. When The Overland Monthly offered him only five dollars for it—and was slow paying—London came close to abandoning his writing career.

In his words, "literally and literarily I was saved" when The Black Cat accepted his story "A Thousand Deaths", and paid him $40—the "first money I ever received for a story." London began his writing career just as new printing technologies enabled lower-cost production of magazines.

This resulted in a boom in popular magazines aimed at a wide public and a strong market for short fiction. In 1900, he made $2,500 in writing, about $71,000 in today's currency. Among the works he sold to magazines was a short story known as either "Diable" (1902) or "Bâtard" (1904), in two editions of the same basic story; London received $141.

25 for this story on May 27, 1902. In the text, a cruel French Canadian brutalizes his dog, and the dog retaliates and kills the man. London told some of his critics that man's actions are the main cause of the behavior of their animals, and he would show this in another story, The Call of the Wild.

Read More

The Hanging of Cultus George

London, Jack 2014

The Hanging of Cultus George is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

On July 12, 1897, London (age 21) and his sister's husband Captain Shepard sailed to join the Klondike Gold Rush. This was the setting for some of his first successful stories. London's time in the Klondike, however, was detrimental to his health. Like so many other men who were malnourished in the goldfields, London developed scurvy.

His gums became swollen, leading to the loss of his four front teeth. A constant gnawing pain affected his hip and leg muscles, and his face was stricken with marks that always reminded him of the struggles he faced in the Klondike. Father William Judge, "The Saint of Dawson," had a facility in Dawson that provided shelter, food and any available medicine to London and others.

His struggles there inspired London's short story, "To Build a Fire" (1902, revised in 1908), which many critics assess as his best. His landlords in Dawson were mining engineers Marshall Latham Bond and Louis Whitford Bond, educated at Yale and Stanford.

The brothers' father, Judge Hiram Bond, was a wealthy mining investor. The Bonds, especially Hiram, were active Republicans. Marshall Bond's diary mentions friendly sparring with London on political issues as a camp pastime. London left Oakland with a social conscience and socialist leanings; he returned to become an activist for socialism.

He concluded that his only hope of escaping the work "trap" was to get an education and "sell his brains". He saw his writing as a business, his ticket out of poverty, and, he hoped, a means of beating the wealthy at their own game. On returning to California in 1898, London began working deliberately to get published, a struggle described in his novel, Martin Eden (serialized in 1908, published in 1909).

His first published story since high school was "To the Man On Trail", which has frequently been collected in anthologies. When The Overland Monthly offered him only five dollars for it—and was slow paying—London came close to abandoning his writing career.

In his words, "literally and literarily I was saved" when The Black Cat accepted his story "A Thousand Deaths", and paid him $40—the "first money I ever received for a story." London began his writing career just as new printing technologies enabled lower-cost production of magazines.

This resulted in a boom in popular magazines aimed at a wide public and a strong market for short fiction. In 1900, he made $2,500 in writing, about $71,000 in today's currency. Among the works he sold to magazines was a short story known as either "Diable" (1902) or "Bâtard" (1904), in two editions of the same basic story; London received $141.

25 for this story on May 27, 1902. In the text, a cruel French Canadian brutalizes his dog, and the dog retaliates and kills the man. London told some of his critics that man's actions are the main cause of the behavior of their animals, and he would show this in another story, The Call of the Wild.

Read More

A Flutter in Eggs

London, Jack 2014

A Flutter in Eggs is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

On July 12, 1897, London (age 21) and his sister's husband Captain Shepard sailed to join the Klondike Gold Rush. This was the setting for some of his first successful stories. London's time in the Klondike, however, was detrimental to his health. Like so many other men who were malnourished in the goldfields, London developed scurvy.

His gums became swollen, leading to the loss of his four front teeth. A constant gnawing pain affected his hip and leg muscles, and his face was stricken with marks that always reminded him of the struggles he faced in the Klondike. Father William Judge, "The Saint of Dawson," had a facility in Dawson that provided shelter, food and any available medicine to London and others.

His struggles there inspired London's short story, "To Build a Fire" (1902, revised in 1908), which many critics assess as his best.

Read More

The King of Mazy May

London, Jack 2014

The King of Mazy May is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

On July 12, 1897, London (age 21) and his sister's husband Captain Shepard sailed to join the Klondike Gold Rush. This was the setting for some of his first successful stories. London's time in the Klondike, however, was detrimental to his health. Like so many other men who were malnourished in the goldfields, London developed scurvy.

His gums became swollen, leading to the loss of his four front teeth. A constant gnawing pain affected his hip and leg muscles, and his face was stricken with marks that always reminded him of the struggles he faced in the Klondike. Father William Judge, "The Saint of Dawson," had a facility in Dawson that provided shelter, food and any available medicine to London and others.

His struggles there inspired London's short story, "To Build a Fire" (1902, revised in 1908), which many critics assess as his best. His landlords in Dawson were mining engineers Marshall Latham Bond and Louis Whitford Bond, educated at Yale and Stanford.

The brothers' father, Judge Hiram Bond, was a wealthy mining investor. The Bonds, especially Hiram, were active Republicans. Marshall Bond's diary mentions friendly sparring with London on political issues as a camp pastime. London left Oakland with a social conscience and socialist leanings; he returned to become an activist for socialism.

He concluded that his only hope of escaping the work "trap" was to get an education and "sell his brains". He saw his writing as a business, his ticket out of poverty, and, he hoped, a means of beating the wealthy at their own game. On returning to California in 1898, London began working deliberately to get published, a struggle described in his novel, Martin Eden (serialized in 1908, published in 1909).

His first published story since high school was "To the Man On Trail", which has frequently been collected in anthologies. When The Overland Monthly offered him only five dollars for it—and was slow paying—London came close to abandoning his writing career.

In his words, "literally and literarily I was saved" when The Black Cat accepted his story "A Thousand Deaths", and paid him $40—the "first money I ever received for a story." London began his writing career just as new printing technologies enabled lower-cost production of magazines.

This resulted in a boom in popular magazines aimed at a wide public and a strong market for short fiction. In 1900, he made $2,500 in writing, about $71,000 in today's currency. Among the works he sold to magazines was a short story known as either "Diable" (1902) or "Bâtard" (1904), in two editions of the same basic story; London received $141.

25 for this story on May 27, 1902. In the text, a cruel French Canadian brutalizes his dog, and the dog retaliates and kills the man. London told some of his critics that man's actions are the main cause of the behavior of their animals, and he would show this in another story, The Call of the Wild.

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Jack London - The Son of the Wolf

London, Jack 2017

John Griffith "Jack" London was born John Griffith Chaney on January 12th, 1876 in San Francisco. His father, William Chaney, was living with his mother Flora Wellman when she became pregnant. Chaney insisted she have an abortion. Flora's response was to turn a gun on herself.

Although her wounds were not severe the trauma made her temporarily deranged. In late 1876 his mother married John London and the young child was brought to live with them as they moved around the Bay area, eventually settling in Oakland where Jack completed grade school.

Jack also worked hard at several jobs, sometimes 12-18 hours a day, but his dream was university. He was lent money for that and after intense studying enrolled in the summer of 1896 at the University of California in Berkeley. In 1897, at 21 , Jack searched out newspaper accounts of his mother's suicide attempt and the name of his biological father.

He wrote to William Chaney, then living in Chicago. Chaney said he could not be London's father because he was impotent; and casually asserted that London's mother had relations with other men. Jack, devastated by the response, quit Berkeley and went to the Klondike.

Though equally because of his continuing dire finances Jack might have taken that as the excuse he needed to leave. In the Klondike Jack began to gather material for his writing but also accumulated many health problems, including scurvy, hip and leg problems many of which he then carried for life.

By the late 1890's Jack was regularly publishing short stories and by the turn of the century full blown novels. By 1904 Jack had married, fathered two children and was now in the process of divorcing. A stint as a reporter on the Russo-Japanese war of 1904 was equal amounts trouble and experience.

But that experience was always put to good use in a remarkable output of work. Twelve years later Jack had amassed a wealth of writings many of which remain world classics. He had a reputation as a social activist and a tireless friend of the workers.

And yet on November 22nd 1916 Jack London died in a cottage on his ranch at the age of only 40. Here we present The Son Of The Wolf.

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The unparalleled invasion / Une invasion sans précédent / La invasión sin paralelo. Première édition trilingue / First trilingual edition

London, Jack 2017

The Unparalleled Invasion is a rare political anticipation short story written by Jack London and first published in McClure's in July 1910 and later in the book The Strength of the Strong (New York, Macmillan, 1914). The story begins in 1910s China. Under the influence of Japan, China modernizes and has its own Meiji Reforms.

In 1922, China breaks away from Japan and fights a brief war that culminates in the Chinese annexation of the Japanese possessions of Korea, Formosa, and Manchuria. Over the next half century, China's population steadily grows, and eventually migration overwhelms European colonies in Asia.

The United States of America and the other Western powers launch a biological warfare campaign against China, resulting in the decimation of China's population. China is then colonized by the Western powers.

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Lost Face.

London, Jack 2018

Lost Face is a collection of seven short stories by Jack London. It takes its name from the first short story in the book, about a European adventurer in the Yukon who outwits his (American) Indian captors' plans to torture him. The book includes London's best-known short story, "To Build a Fire".

Lost Face Trust To Build a Fire That Spot Flush of Gold The Passing of Marcus O'Brien The Wit of Porportuk

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The Turtle Of Tasman

London, Jack 2019
A minor collection that includes the amazing "Told in the Drooling Ward." Read More

Lost Face

London, Jack 2019

Lost Face is a collection of seven short stories by Jack London. It takes its named from the first short story in the book, about a European adventurer in the Yukon who outwits his Indian captors' plans to torture him. This collection includes London's best-known short story, To Build a Fire.

It tells the story of a new traveler in the Klondike who ignores warnings about traveling alone and whose life depends on the ability to build a fire. Also included are Trust, That Spot, Flush of Gold, The Passing of Marcus O'Brien, and The Wit of Porportuk.

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Tales Of Fish Patrol

London, Jack 2019
Stories set on the San Francisco Bay of London's youth, including "A Raid on the Oyster Pirates." Read More

The Night Born

London, Jack 2019
A varied collection including "War," "The Mexican," and "To Kill a Man." Read More

Publication Order of Non-Fiction Books

The People of the Abyss

London, Jack 1903

The People of the Abyss (1903) is a book by Jack London about life in the East End of London in 1902. He wrote this first-hand account by living in the East End (including the Whitechapel District) for several months, sometimes staying in workhouses or sleeping on the streets.

The conditions he experienced and wrote about were the same as those endured by an estimated 500,000 of the contemporary London poor.

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The War of the Classes

London, Jack 1906
A classic non-fiction work which describes the struggle for survival by the working class during Jack London's day and age. Read More

The Cruise of the Snark

London, Jack 1907

In this classic by a master of the adventure story, Jack London describes his around the world attempt by sail, which was inspired by the examples of his heroes Herman Melville, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Joshua Slocum. He sailed out from San Francisco, writing constantly and produces this series of sketches recording the voyage itself.

These pieces, collected together, he called The Cruise of the Snark. The writings reveal London’s extraordinary love of adventure.

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The Road

London, Jack 1907

The Road is a series of tales and reminiscences of Jack London's hobo days. It relates the tricks that hoboes used to evade train crews, and reminisces about his travels with Kelly's Army. He credits his story-telling skill to the hobo's necessity of concocting tales to coax meals from sympathetic strangers.

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Revolution and Other Essays

London, Jack 1909

I received a letter the other day. It was from a man in Arizona. It began, "Dear Comrade." It ended, "Yours for the Revolution." I replied to the letter, and my letter began, "Dear Comrade." It ended, "Yours for the Revolution." In the United States there are 400,000 men, of men and women nearly 1,000,000, who begin their letters "Dear Comrade," and end them "Yours for the Revolution.

" In Germany there are 3,000,000 men who begin their letters "Dear Comrade" and end them "Yours for the Revolution"; in France, 1,000,000 men; in Austria, 800,000 men; in Belgium, 300,000 men; in Italy, 250,000 men; in England, 100,000 men; in Switzerland, 100,000 men; in Denmark, 55,000 men; in Sweden, 50,000 men; in Holland, 40,000 men; in Spain, 30,000 men-comrades all, and revolutionists.

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John Barleycorn

London, Jack 1913
The American author recounts a lengthy sea voyage during which he discovered the social, nonorganic causes of his destructive drinking habits Read More

Essays of Revolt

London, Jack 1926

This book first printed in 1926 is a collection of 6 essay's written by Jack London for various American popular magazines in the early 1900's. London died in 1914 and these essay's were gathered and published by his wife Charmian london. The titles of the chapters are 1.

"The Apostate", 2. "The Dream of Debs", 3. "How I became a Socialist", 4. "The Scab", 5. "What Life Means To Me", 6. "Revolution"

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No Mentor But Myself

London, Jack 1978
Gathers London's essays and selections from his letters, reviews, and novels concerning writers and writing Read More

Our Hawaii

London, Jack 2015

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.

This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc.

Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

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Publication Order of Short Story Collections

The Son Of The Wolf

London, Jack 1900

This anthology is a thorough introduction to classic literature for those who have not yet experienced these literary masterworks. For those who have known and loved these works in the past, this is an invitation to reunite with old friends in a fresh new format.

From Shakespeare s finesse to Oscar Wilde s wit, this unique collection brings together works as diverse and influential as The Pilgrim s Progress and Othello. As an anthology that invites readers to immerse themselves in the masterpieces of the literary giants, it is must-have addition to any library.

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'Dutch Courage' and Other Stories

London, Jack 1900

Jack London was one of the most prolific American writers of the early 20th century, and remains one of the most beloved, but while his novels have remained continuously in print for a century, his short stories have been much harder to find. Many of the stories are very well-informed reflective narratives, drawing directly from London's own experiences.

This includes his time as a sailor on different vessels in the South Pacific. Check out our other books at www.dogstailbooks.co.uk

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The Faith of Men and Other Stories

London, Jack 1902

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

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Children of the Frost

London, Jack 1902

This anthology is a thorough introduction to classic literature for those who have not yet experienced these literary masterworks. For those who have known and loved these works in the past, this is an invitation to reunite with old friends in a fresh new format.

From Shakespeare s finesse to Oscar Wilde s wit, this unique collection brings together works as diverse and influential as The Pilgrim s Progress and Othello. As an anthology that invites readers to immerse themselves in the masterpieces of the literary giants, it is must-have addition to any library.

Read More

A Daughter of the Aurora

London, Jack 1902

A Daughter of the Aurora is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

Read More

Amateur Night

London, Jack 1903

Amateur Night is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

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The Call Of The Wild And Selected Stories

London, Jack 1905
Out of the white wilderness of the Far North, Jack London drew the inspiration for his tales of perilous adventure and animal cunning. Includes: Diable-A Dog; An Odyssey of the North; To the Man on Trail; To Build a Fire; Love of Life Read More

Tales of the Fish Patrol

London, Jack 1905

From "White and Yellow": San Francisco Bay is so large that often its storms are more disastrous to ocean-going craft than is the ocean itself in its violent moments. The waters of the bay contain all manner of fish, wherefore its surface is plowed by the keels of all manner of fishing boats manned by all manner of fishermen.

To protect the fish from this motley floating population many wise laws have been passed, and there is a fish patrol to see that these laws are enforced. Exciting times are the lot of the fish patrol: in its history more than one dead patrolman has marked defeat, and more often dead fishermen across their illegal nets have marked success.

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Brown Wolf and Other Stories by Jack London, Fiction, Action & Adventure

London, Jack 1906

Effort has been made by the editor to bring together in one volume a number of such stories, not for the reason alone that there might be another Jack London book for boys, but also in order to add to our juvenile literature a volume likely "to be chewed and digested," as Bacon says, a book worthy "to be read whole, and with diligence and attention.

" For my belief is that boys read altogether too few of such books. Or perhaps it would be more correct to say, have too few opportunities to read such books, because so often we fail to see how quick in their reading their minds are to grasp the more difficult, and how keen and competent their conscience to draw the right conclusion when situations are presented wherein men err so grievously.

Boys delight in men who have had adventures, and when they are privileged to read of such exploits in thrilling story form, that is the "seventh heaven" for them. Such a "boys' man" was Jack London, whose whole life was one of stirring action on land and sea.

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A Day's Lodging

London, Jack 1906

A Day's Lodging is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

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The Call of the Wild, White Fang, and Other Stories

London, Jack 1906

Of all Jack London's fictions none have been as popular as his dog stories. In addition to The Call of the Wild, the epic tale of a Californian dog's adventures during the Klondike gold rush, this edition includes White Fang, and five famous short stories - `B�tard', `Moon-Face', `Brown Wolf', `That Spot', and `To Build a Fire'.

About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

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Brown Wolf

London, Jack 1906

She had delayed, because of the dew-wet grass, in order to put on her overshoes, and when she emerged from the house found her waiting husband absorbed in the wonder of a bursting almond-bud. She sent a questing glance across the tall grass and in and out among the orchard trees.

“Where’s Wolf?” she asked.

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Moon-Face and Other Stories

London, Jack 1906
A classic collection of short stories, including the following: MOON-FACE, THE LEOPARD MAN'S STORY, LOCAL COLOR, AMATEUR NIGHT, THE MINIONS OF MIDAS, THE SHADOW AND THE FLASH, ALL GOLD CANYON, PLANCHETTE. Read More

Aloha OE

London, Jack 1908

Aloha Oe is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

On July 12, 1897, London (age 21) and his sister's husband Captain Shepard sailed to join the Klondike Gold Rush. This was the setting for some of his first successful stories. London's time in the Klondike, however, was detrimental to his health. Like so many other men who were malnourished in the goldfields, London developed scurvy.

His gums became swollen, leading to the loss of his four front teeth. A constant gnawing pain affected his hip and leg muscles, and his face was stricken with marks that always reminded him of the struggles he faced in the Klondike. Father William Judge, "The Saint of Dawson," had a facility in Dawson that provided shelter, food and any available medicine to London and others.

His struggles there inspired London's short story, "To Build a Fire" (1902, revised in 1908), which many critics assess as his best. His landlords in Dawson were mining engineers Marshall Latham Bond and Louis Whitford Bond, educated at Yale and Stanford.

The brothers' father, Judge Hiram Bond, was a wealthy mining investor. The Bonds, especially Hiram, were active Republicans. Marshall Bond's diary mentions friendly sparring with London on political issues as a camp pastime. London left Oakland with a social conscience and socialist leanings; he returned to become an activist for socialism.

He concluded that his only hope of escaping the work "trap" was to get an education and "sell his brains". He saw his writing as a business, his ticket out of poverty, and, he hoped, a means of beating the wealthy at their own game. On returning to California in 1898, London began working deliberately to get published, a struggle described in his novel, Martin Eden (serialized in 1908, published in 1909).

His first published story since high school was "To the Man On Trail", which has frequently been collected in anthologies. When The Overland Monthly offered him only five dollars for it—and was slow paying—London came close to abandoning his writing career.

In his words, "literally and literarily I was saved" when The Black Cat accepted his story "A Thousand Deaths", and paid him $40—the "first money I ever received for a story." London began his writing career just as new printing technologies enabled lower-cost production of magazines.

This resulted in a boom in popular magazines aimed at a wide public and a strong market for short fiction. In 1900, he made $2,500 in writing, about $71,000 in today's currency. Among the works he sold to magazines was a short story known as either "Diable" (1902) or "Bâtard" (1904), in two editions of the same basic story; London received $141.

25 for this story on May 27, 1902. In the text, a cruel French Canadian brutalizes his dog, and the dog retaliates and kills the man. London told some of his critics that man's actions are the main cause of the behavior of their animals, and he would show this in another story, The Call of the Wild.

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To Build a Fire and Other Stories

London, Jack 1908

Tor Classics are affordably-priced editions designed to attract the young reader. Original dynamic cover art enthusiastically represents the excitement of each story. Appropriate "reader friendly" type sizes have been chosen for each title—offering clear, accurate, and readable text.

All editions are complete and unabridged, and feature Introductions and Afterwords.This edition of To Build a Fire and Other Stories includes an Introduction, Biographical Note, and Afterword by David Lubar.It was so cold that his spit froze in the air before it hit the ground.

He was so far above the Artic Circle that the sun never rose. Seventy below zero, and there was nothing but whiteness in every direction: ice and snow. No trees, no houses, no wood, no warmth.He had only a few matches and a handful of frozen fingers.

And yet, to survive, he had to build a fire...Jack London's tales of adventure were unsurpassed because London was there. From Alaska to the Yukon, from the Klondike to the Arctic tundra, London knew the outlaws and the wolves, the prospectors and the grizzlies.

In these collected stories of man against the wilderness, London lays claim to the title of greatest outdoor adventure writer of all time.

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The Strength of the Strong

London, Jack 1909

"The Strength of the Strong" is a collection of short stories containing some of Jack London’s best work. Besides the title piece there are six tales: South of the Slot, The Unparalleled Invasion, The Enemy of all the World, The Dream of Debs, The Sea Farmer and Samuel.

They are representative of London stories---his most mature and interesting work startlingly original as to the theme and masterly as to treatment.

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The Madness of John Harned

London, Jack 1909

Jack London was an American novelist, journalist, and social activist. A pioneer in the world of commercial magazine fiction, he was one of the first writers to become a worldwide celebrity and earn a large fortune from writing. He was also an innovator in the genre that would later become known as science fiction.

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The Benefit of the Doubt

London, Jack 1910

John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

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South Sea Tales

London, Jack 1911

Like the celebrated Klondike Tales, the stories that comprise South Sea Tales derive their intensity from the author’s own far-flung adventures, conveying an impassioned, unsparing vision borne only of experience. The powerful tales gathered here vividly evoke the turn-of-the-century colonial Pacific and its capricious tropical landscape, while also trenchantly observing the delicate interplay between imperialism and the exotic.

And as Tony Horwitz asserts in his Introduction, “When London’s stories click, we are utterly there, at the edge of the world and the limit of human endurance.”

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A Son of the Sun

London, Jack 1912

Entertaining, atmospheric, and action-filled--yet difficult to obtain until now--the eight short stories in Jack London’s A Son of the Sun center on the thrilling exploits of Captain David Grief in the dangerous and exotic South Seas. Captain Grief encounters the adventurers, scoundrels, pirates, and opportunists who followed the example of their colonial predecessors and exploited the islands and their resources early in the twentieth century.

Inspired by London’s own voyage through the South Seas on board his self-made yacht, the Snark, these stories paint a colorful--and at times horrifying--picture of the remote South Pacific. Thomas R. Tietze and Gary J. Riedl provide concise and illuminating introductions to each story as well as informative notes.

The volume is enlivened by reproductions of London’s own photographs and maps, and by the illustrations that accompanied each story when first published.

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The Yukon writings of Jack London

London, Jack 1912
the yukon writings of jack london Read More

The House of Pride

London, Jack 1912

"Never are there such departures as from the dock at Honolulu. The great transport lay with steam up, ready to pull out. A thousand persons were on her decks; five thousand stood on the wharf. Up and down the long gangway passed native princes and princesses, sugar kings and the high officials of the Territory.

Beyond, in long lines, kept in order by the native police, were the carriages and motor-cars of the Honolulu aristocracy. On the wharf the Royal Hawaiian Band played 'Aloha Oe,' and when it finished, a stringed orchestra of native musicians on board the transport took up the same sobbing strains, the native woman singer's voice rising birdlike above the instruments and the hubbub of departure.

" - From "Aloha Oe"

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The Night-Born and Other Stories

London, Jack 1913

It was in the old Alta-Inyo Club-a warm night for San Francisco-and through the open windows, hushed and far, came the brawl of the streets. The talk had led on from the Graft Prosecution and the latest signs that the town was to be run wide open, down through all the grotesque sordidness and rottenness of manhate and man-meanness, until the name of O'Brien was mentioned-O'Brien, the promising young pugilist who had been killed in the prize-ring the night before.

At once the air had seemed to freshen. O'Brien had been a clean-living young man with ideals. He neither drank, smoked, nor swore, and his had been the body of a beautiful young god. He had even carried his prayer-book to the ringside. They found it in his coat pocket in the dressing-room.

. . afterward.

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In Hawaii with Jack London

London 1916
First published in 2001. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company. Read More

The Turtles of Tasman

London, Jack 1916
First published in 1916. Read More

The Human Drift

London, Jack 1917

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process.

We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

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On the Makaloa Mat

London, Jack 1919

Jack London (1876-1916), was an American author and a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction. He was one of the first Americans to make a lucrative career exclusively from writing. London was self-educated. He taught himself in the public library, mainly just by reading books.

In 1898, he began struggling seriously to break into print, a struggle memorably described in his novel, Martin Eden (1909). Jack London was fortunate in the timing of his writing career. He started just as new printing technologies enabled lower-cost production of magazines.

This resulted in a boom in popular magazines aimed at a wide public, and a strong market for short fiction. In 1900, he made $2,500 in writing, the equivalent of about $75,000 today. His career was well under way. Among his famous works are: Children of the Frost (1902), The Call of the Wild (1903), The Sea Wolf (1904), The Game (1905), White Fang (1906), The Road (1907), Before Adam (1907), Adventure (1911), and The Scarlet Plague (1912).

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The Bones of Kahekili

London, Jack 1919

The Bones of Kahekili is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

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Jack London's California: The Golden Poppy and Other Writings

London, Jack 1955
Collects short stories, articles, and reviews by the novelist that focus on California Read More

The Sea-Wolf and Other Stories

London, Jack 1964
Vagrant deckhand, socialist, gold-digger and alcoholic, Jack London died, burntout, at the age of forty. "The Sea-Wolf" is based on his own brutal experiences on a sea-hunting voyage in a world where 'might is right and weakness is wrong.' Read More

Stories of Hawaii

Jack London 1965
A collection of short stories written after London and his wife Charmian visit the Hawaiian islands in 1907. Read More

The Call of the Wild and Other Stories

Jack London 1965
A young dog, abused by men and his hungry rivals on a Klondike dog team, escapes to join a wolfpack. Read More

The Science Fiction Stories of Jack London

London, Jack 1975
A collection of Jack London popular science fiction short stories, includes "The Star Rover", "Before Adam" and "The Shadow and the Flash" Read More

The Unabridged Jack London

London, Jack 1981
More unabridged classics Read More

Klondike Tales

London, Jack 1982

As a young man in the summer of 1897, Jack London joined the Klondike gold rush. From that seminal experience emerged these gripping, inimitable wilderness tales, which have endured as some of London’s best and most defining work. With remarkable insight and unflinching realism, London describes the punishing adversity that awaited men in the brutal, frozen expanses of the Yukon, and the extreme tactics these adventurers and travelers adopted to survive.

As Van Wyck Brooks observed, “One felt that the stories had been somehow lived–that they were not merely observed–that the author was not telling tales but telling his life.”This edition is unique to the Modern Library, featuring twenty-three carefully chosen stories from London’s three collected Northland volumes and his later Klondike tales.

It also includes two maps of the region, and notes on the text.

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Tales of Hawaii

Jack London 1989
Excellent Book Read More

Tales of the Pacific

London, Jack 1989

Jack London (1876-1916) was born in squalor and rose to become one of the most recognized names in American literature. London's travel and adventure stories have made him a favorite not only among young American boys, but also among scholars and authors like George Orwell and Ernest Hemingway because of his ability to infuse his writing with his own unique philosophical beliefs.

As an ardent Socialist, London's views were an often overwhelming mix of Nietzsche, Marx and Darwin's theories on evolution and society, in whom he was thoroughly well-read. During the last few years of his short life London travelled around the Pacific islands, recording stories to be compiled in this collection.

The stories skirt the line between fiction and non-fiction, illustrating the lush beauty of the Hawaiian Islands through London's characteristically evocative and dramatic style. These stories are viewed by some as London's finest writing.

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The Collected Jack London

Kasdin, Steven J. 1991

In this, the first fully-rounded collection of his work, we find Jack London at his best. It has been said that his greatest artistic creation was his own life, and this outstanding anthology presents a many sided view of this brilliant and controversial American writer.

Included here are the finest and best known of his stories and novels, but also included here are the autobiographical works that show the seldom-seen Jack London, the man.

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Five Great Short Stories

Jack London 1992

One of the most widely read of all American writers, Jack London (1876–1916) based his novels and stories on the experiences and observations of a life that took him from the frozen wilds of the Klondike to the sun-drenched atolls of the South Seas.

This volume presents a selection of five of his best stories, each brimming with the energy, color, and drive typical of London's vivid story-telling style."The White Silence," "In a Far Country," and "An Odyssey of the North" are suspenseful tales that bring the harshness of the frozen wilderness of the north powerfully to life.

"The Seed of McCoy" reflects London's experience as a sailor in the South Pacific. The last story, "The Mexican," displays London's celebrated talents as a sportswriter in this sympathetic portrayal of a prizefighter working for the success of the Mexican Revolution.

Here are five stories that epitomize Jack London's mastery of the adventure story and the compelling prose style that influenced generations of writers.

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Northland Stories

London, Jack 1997

Like the characters in the popular dime novels of the time, London's heroes display such manly virtues as courage, loyalty, and steadfastness as they conftont the merciless frozen expanses of the north. Yet London breaks free of stereotypical figures and one-dimensional plots to explore deeper psychological and social questions of self-mastery, masculinity, and racial domination.

The uneasy relationship between the Native Americans and whites lies at the heart of many of the stories, while others reflect London's growing awareness of the destruction wrought by the white incursion on Indian culture.Northland Stories comprises nineteen of Jack London's greatest short works, including "An Odyssy of the North" (London's major breakthrough as a young author), "The White Silence," "The Law of Life," "The League of the Old Men," and the world classic "To Build a Fire.

"For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines.

Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. 

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Fantastic Tales

London, Jack 1998

Jack London’s fabled powers to entertain and enthrall are in full force in this collection of fifteen fantastic tales. The restless energy of his vision ranges far in time and space, from the psychological tension of an extraterrestrial encounter to a frontier tall tale of a trapper hunting a mammoth.

London tells an effective Victorian gothic story and offers an intriguing consideration of the science and problems of invisibility. Particularly gripping are the well-imagined horrors and new worlds of the future, including a chilling novella depicting a world ravaged by an alien virus.

These remarkable stories testify to the wide-ranging creative power of one of America’s great writers.

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Jack London in Aloha-Land

London 2000

Mrs London writes in her foreword "In this journal covering a few months spent ten years ago in Hawaii, concluding with a resume of experiences there in 1915-1916, I have tried to limn a picture of the charm of the Hawaiian islander as he was, and is becoming, with the enchantment of his lofty isles, and their abundant hospitality.

During the original writing many elisions were advised by Jack London, as being too personal of himself for me, being me, to publish. However, in the circumstances of his untimely passing, and in view of a desire made evident to me in countless letters as well as in the press, for biographical work, I have been led to reinstate and elaborate much of the mass of data.

Even in face of his objections at the time, I had stoutly disagreed, maintaining that the lovers of his soul and his work would value revelation of his personality and manner of living life."

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Stories of Ships and the Sea

London, Jack 2006

In these vivid stories, London pits nature at its most extreme against men who must struggle violently to survive. Whether describing ore cables strung across a valley in Sacramento gold-mine territory or the straining boards of ships battered by gales, London's eye for realism keeps his dramatic tales vivid and fresh -- even now, nearly a century after his death.

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Jack London's Tales of Cannibals and Headhunters

London, Jack 2006

A ship's captain, his vessel ready to explode from a fire within its cargo hold, desperately searches for a way to save his crew. A missionary in Fiji is clubbed to death by a cannibal chief to satisfy a debt of honor. A scientist agrees to have his head chopped off in return for a last glimpse of a huge alien object half-buried in the jungles of Guadalcanal.

A Melanesian youth, sold into slavery, gains revenge against his sadistic white overseer. With unbridled barbarity, the crew of a European ship massacres scores of islanders.These are some of the incidents in the action-filled short stories found in Jack London's Tales of Cannibals and Headhunters.

Though London's bestsellers about the frozen Northland are known to most, few readers are familiar with his tales set in the romantic and dangerous South Seas - an area of the world with which Jack London became intimate while traveling aboard his yacht, The Snark, in the first decade of the twentieth century.

For the first time these stories are collected in a single volume with notes, an introduction, and an afterword that help to illuminate the racial tension of the colonial period in the Pacific. The stories are illustrated with the original artwork, several maps (including one of London's own), and photographs of the region.

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The Asian Writings of Jack London

London, Jack 2009

This work provides an overview of London's journalistic and literary contributions about Asia, his insights into Asian ethnic and political complexities, and his vision for pan-Asian / American cooperation. An anthology of London's major writings on Asia including all of his dispatches from Asia is included.

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San Francisco Stories

London, Jack 2010

From one of America's great writers, this delightful collection - the first of its kind - contains twenty-three adventurous tales set in the San Francisco Bay Area. If San Francisco has captured the world's imagination through the hardboiled stories of Dashiell Hammett, the prose and poetry of Jack Kerouac and his fellow Beats, through Orson Welles' Lady From Shanghai and Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, it is as a romantic city of vast suspension bridges and foggy back alleys, not as the wild west of Jack London's day.

Pre-quake San Francisco was a tough town, and Jack London - hobo, sailor, oyster pirate, hard drinker - was pretty tough, too. Although famous for his stories of the Klondike and the Pacific, London wrote extensively about his home base. This collection contains such classic stories as 'The Apostate' and 'South of the Slot' as well as extracts from John Barleycorn and The Sea-Wolf.

The overlooked 1905 story cycle Tales of the Fish Patrol is included in its entirety. London's vivid eyewitness report of the Great 1906 Earthquake and Fire - which destroyed forever the old city - stands as a fitting epilogue. Discover a vanished San Francisco in these wonderful stories of Jack London.

Selected as one of the 16 BOOKS TO READ IF YOU LOVE SAN FRANCISCO: "Most of us know San Francisco as a soft foggy charmfest of a city. But it wasn’t always so tame. Jack London’s San Francisco Stories chronicles the tougher annals of SF’s pre-earthquake days, and includes Jack London’s firsthand account of the city burning in the wake of the 1906 quake.

Either a must-read or must-avoid for anyone waiting for the next shaker. In this collection, you can find the San Francisco that is no longer, but still haunts the back allies. Recommended for: True lovers of San Francisco [and] neighborhood dive bar drinkers.

" —ANISSE GROSS, BuzzFeed.com "A meaty, compactly packaged book. If you don't have these stories, a great intro to a city that was lost in the 1906 quake and fire, by the most famous author born in town." —DON HERRON, the San Francisco Dashiell Hammett Tour "This collection by scholar and writer Matthew Asprey finally brings together London's best writing about the coastal communities of Northern California that he loved so well.

" —RODGER JACOBS, Journalist, Author, Jack London Scholar

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Sailing Ships and Other Adventures

London, Jack 2011

This book is a collection of Jack London's short stories about his experiences sailing and seal hunting in the Pacific Ocean during the late 1800s. An additional adventure looks at life along the Sacramento River. The five showcased stories are adapted to increasingly higher reading levels--from 6.

2 to 9.8 on the Flesch-Kincaid Reading scale. Maps, drawings, and photographs help bring alive the age of sailing and the courage of young sailors. A special section describes and illustrates the different types of sailing vessels, and a glossary and footnotes help the reader understand nautical terms.

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Island Tales...

London, Jack 2012

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process.

We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

++++ The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to ensure edition identification: ++++ <title> Island Tales<author> Jack London<publisher> Mills, 1920<subjects> Fiction; Classics; Fiction / Classics; Fiction / Literary

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The Science Fiction of Jack London

London, Jack 2012

Jack London science fiction has widely been cited as influencing such writers as H.G. Wells, Yevgeny Zamyatin, and Aldous Huxley; many consider his work "The Iron Will" to be the foundation for all dystopia novels to come. Collected here is an anthology of Jack London's science fiction novels with an active table of contents.

A short biography about the life and times of Jack London is also included. Works included in this collection: Before Adam A Curious Fragment Goliah The Iron Heel The Man with the Gash Planchette The Red One The Rejuvenation of Major Rathbone A Relic of the Pliocene The Scarlet Plague The Shadow and the Flash The Star-Rover The Strength of the Strong The Unparalleled Invasion When the World Was Young

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When God Laughs and Other Stories

London, Jack 2013
A wonderful collection of short stories, including the following: WHEN GOD LAUGHS, THE APOSTATE, A WICKED WOMAN, JUST MEAT, CREATED HE THEM, THE CHINAGO, MAKE WESTING, SEMPER IDEM, A NOSE FOR THE KING, THE "FRANCIS SPAIGHT", A CURIOUS FRAGMENT, A PIECE OF STEAK. Read More

The Works of Jack London. --

London, Jack 2013

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ...of the spare state-room. The wind was freshening rapidly, the Ghost heeling over more and more, and by the time the state-room was ready she was dashing through the water at'a lively clip.

I had quite forgotten the existence of Leach and Johnson, when suddenly, like a thunderclap, " Boat ho!" came down the open companionway. It was Smoke's unmistakable voice, crying from the masthead. I shot a glance at the woman, but she was leaning back in the armchair, her eyes closed, unutterably tired.

I doubted that "she had heard, and Imresolved to prevent her seeinglthe brutality I knew wouldfollowythe capture of the dese_r_te_rs. wa'siHEé&1'.i"V'ery good. Sh_e_sho_uld_s1eep. Tfiéréwérei swift commands on deck, a stamping of feet and a slapping of reef-points as the Ghost shot into the wind and about on the other tack.

As she filled away and heeled, the ann-chair began to slide across the cabin floor, and I sprang for it just in time to prevent the rescued woman from being spilled out. Her eyes were too heavy to suggest more than a hint of the sleepy surprise that perplexed her as she looked fr up_ at me, and she half stumbled, half tottered, as I led her to her cabin.

Mugridge grinned insinuatingly in my face as I shoved him out and ordered him back to his galley work; and he won his revenge by spreading glowing reports among the hunters as to what an excellent " lydy's myde " I was proving myself to be. She leaned heavily against me, and I do believe that she had fallen asleep again between the arm-chair and the state-room.

This I discovered when she nearly fell into the bunk during a sudden lurch of the schooner. She aroused, smiled drowsily, and was off to sleep again; and...

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'The Turtles of Tasman' and Other Stories

London, Jack 2013

Jack London was one of the most prolific American writers of the early 20th century, and remains one of the most beloved, but while his novels have remained continuously in print for a century, his short stories have been much harder to find. London liked to experiment with diverse subject matter and literary techniques.

This collection, published near the end of his life, is astonishing in its variety of subject matter and style, and yet, as in everything he wrote, London retains his essential humanity.

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'The Red One' and Other Stories

London, Jack 2013

This is a collection of four stories by Jack London, most of which are very good. The collection is named after the first story, "The Red One", an excellent piece of old school science fiction along the lines of Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, or Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World.

It tells the story of a naturalist lost on the island of Guadalcanal, searching for a mysterious red object worshipped by the island's natives. It's incredibly inventive, years ahead of its time, suspenseful, brilliantly told, and one of London's best stories.

Another great adventure story is "Like Argus of the Ancient Times", about a former California `49er who, in his seventies, decides to set out for the Klondike for one more chance at striking it rich. While "The Red One" probably deserves a place in London's top ten, "Argus" just might make the top twenty.

"The Princess" is about three aged hobos who cross paths and trade stories about their youthful adventures in the South Pacific.

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'The Strength of the Strong' and Other Stories

London, Jack 2013

Jack London was one of the most prolific American writers of the early 20th century, and remains one of the most beloved, but while his novels have remained continuously in print for a century, his short stories have been much harder to find. This varied and eclectic collection shows many of his concerns and interests: the lives of the indigenous people of America, man's struggle agaianst nature, his sympathy and compassion for the poor, and his predilection for writing stories set in a dystopian future

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The Curious Fragment

London, Jack 2013

The Curious Fragment is a short story by Jack London. John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney, January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

He is best remembered as the author of The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The Heathen", and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

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The Leopard Man's Story

Jack London 2014

If you were a reporter looking for a story from one who was a part of a visiting circus who would you visit? What would you ask? Classic writer Jack London takes on the role and shares a story about why it may not be in your best interest to upset a member of the circus.

This story bites back. Narrated by Glenn Hascall.

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The Complete Poetry of Jack London

London, Jack 2014

This is a seminal book-fully revised with new poetry and photographs-of exploration and discovery into the literary genesis of Jack London, one of American's most famous authors. It brings together all the poetry of Jack London to support the assertion that he was first and foremost a poet who wrote fiction and nonfiction and not a writer of fiction and nonfiction who also wrote poetry.

After more than 30 years of research in all the known depositories and databases of Jack London material, Wichlan publishes his groundbreaking research and analysis. The book contains the poetry embedded in London's writing and correctly identifies previously uncredited authors and defines the poetry probably written by Jack London.

Included in this book are two published plays in verse, "The First Poet" and "The Acorn Planter," and book inscriptions Jack London wrote in his first editions given to his first wife, Bessie Maddern, their children and his second wife, Charmian London.

Twenty-eight pages from his first log book "No 1-Magazine Sales" are reproduced, which reveal the true extent of London's avid study of classical prosody taken from a previously unknown source. In an extended introduction Dan Wichlan cites many examples and quotes from London's 55 books, numerous letters, and descriptions of his life with poetry from Charmian London's biography of her husband.

Dan connects and links London's words and actions from many sources to support the central theme of the book that Jack London was a poet and his lyrical prose style a direct consequence of prosodic studies, poetic aspirations and a lifelong passion for poetry.

Therefore, this book is essential reading for those interested in discovering the true Jack London.

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Negore the Coward

London, Jack 2014

He had followed the trail of his fleeing people for eleven days, and his pursuit had been in itself a flight; for behind him he knew full well were the dreaded Russians, toiling through the swampy lowlands and over the steep divides, bent on no less than the extermination of all his people.

He was travelling light. A rabbit-skin sleeping-robe, a muzzle-loading rifle, and a few pounds of sun-dried salmon constituted his outfit. He would have marvelled that a whole people—women and children and aged—could travel so swiftly, had he not known the terror that drove them on.

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Small-Boat Sailing

London, Jack 2014

American author Jack London–best known for his fiction writing set during the Klondike Gold Rush of the late 1800s–was also an avid sailor. "Small-Boat Sailing," was published in 1917 in The Human Drift, a collection of short stories and essays. London recounts his time at sea, including travels on fishing schooners and coal ships but mostly on small sailboats on San Francisco Bay.

His description of the hard work, excitement, and thrill of handling a small boat in trouble on the water will be exhilarating to anyone who's experienced it or only wished they had.This short work is part of Applewood's American Roots series, tactile mementos of American passions by some of America’s most famous writers.

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The Complete Short Stories of Jack London, Volume 1

London, Jack 2015

This collection of the short stories of Jack London has all of the following works: An Adventure in the Upper Sea, All Gold Canon, Aloha Oe, Amateur Night, And ‘Frisco Kid Came Back, The Apostate, God of His Fathers, At the Rainbow’s End, Bald-Face, The Banks of the Sacramento, Batard, The Benefit of the Doubt, The Bones of Kahekili, Brown Wolf, Bunches of Knuckles, By the Turtles of Tasman, The Captain of the Susan Drew, Charley’s Coup, Chased by the Trail, The Chinago, Chris Farrington, Able Seaman, Chun Ah Chun, Created He Them, A Curious Fragment, A Daughter of the Aurora, A Day’s Lodging, The Death of Ligoun, Demetrios Contos, The Devil’s Dice Box, The Devils of Fuatino, A Dream Image, The Dream of Debs, Dutch Courage, The End of the Chapter, The End of the Story, The Enemy of All the World, The Eternity of Forms, Even Unto Death, The Faith of Men, The Feathers of the Sun, Finis, Flush of Gold, A Flutter in Eggs, The “Francis Spaight”, “Frisco Kid’s” Story, The “Fuzziness” of Hoockla-Heen, A Goboto Night, The God of His Fathers, Goliah, Good-Bye, Jack!, The Great Interrogation, The Grilling of Loren Ellery, Grit of Women, The Handsome Cabin Boy, The Hanging of Cultus George, The Heathen, The Hobo and the Fairy, The House of Mapuhi, The House of Pride, The Hussy, A Hyperborean Brew, In a Far Country, In the Forest of the North, In the Time of Prince Charley, In Yeddo Bay, The Inevitable White Man, Jan, the Unrepentant, The Jokers of New Gibbon, Just Meat

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The Complete Short Stories of Jack London, Volume 2

London, Jack 2015

This collection of the short stories of Jack London has all of the following works: The Kanaka Surf, Keesh, Son of Keesh, The King of Mazy May, The King of the Greeks, A Klondike Christmas, Koolau the Leper, The Law of Life, The League of the Old Men, The Leopard Man’s Story, A Lesson in Heraldry, Li-Wan, the Fair, Like Argus of the Ancient Times, A Little Account, The Little Man, Local Color, Lost Face, The Lost Poacher, Love of Life, The Madness of John Harned, The Mahatma’s Little Joke, Make Westing, The Man on the Other Bank.

, The Man With the Gash, The Marriage to Lit-Lit, The Master of Mystery, Mauki, The Meat, The Men of Forty-Mile, The Mexican, The Minions of Midas, The Mistake of Creation, Moon-Face, Nam-Bok, the Unveracious, Negore, the Coward, The Night-Born, A Night’s Swim in Yeddo Bay, A Northland Miracle, A Nose For the King, O Haru, An Odyssey of the North, Old Baldy, An Old Soldier’s Story, On the Makaloa Mat, “One More Unfortunate”, The One Thousand Dozen, The Passing of Marcus O’Brien, The Pearls of Parlay, A Piece of Steak, The Plague Ship, Planchette, Pluck and Pertinacity, The Priestly Prerogative, The Princess, The Prodigal Father, The Proper “Girlie”, The Proud Goat of Aloysius Pankburn, The Race For Number Three, A Raid On the Oyster Pirates, The Red One, The Rejuvenation of Major Rathbone, A Relic of the Pliocene, Sakaicho, Hona Asi and Hakadaki, Samuel

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The Complete Short Stories of Jack London, Volume 3

London, Jack 2015

This collection of the short stories of Jack London has all of the following works: The Scorn of Women, The Sea Farmer, The Seed of Mccoy, Semper Idem, The Shadow and the Flash, The Sheriff of Kona, Shin-Bones, Shorty Dreams, The Sickness of Lone Chief, The Siege of the ‘Lancashire Queen’, Siwash, A Son of the Sun, The Son of the Wolf, South of the Slot, The Stampede to Squaw Creek.

, Story of a Typhoon, The Story of Jees Uck, The Story of Keesh, The Strange Experience of a Misogynist, The Strength of the Strong, The Sun Dog Trail, The Sunlanders, The Taste of the Meat, The Tears of Ah Kim, The Terrible Solomons, The Test: a Clondyke Wooing, Thanksgiving On Slav Creek, That Spot, Their Alcove, A Thousand Deaths, To Build a Fire (Early Version), To Build a Fire (Later Version), To Kill a Man, To Repel Boarders, To the Man On the Trail, Told in the Drooling Ward, Too Much Gold, The Town-Site of Tra-Lee, Trust, Two Gold Bricks, Under the Deck Awnings, The Unexpected, The Unmasking of a Cad, The Unparalleled Invasion, Up The Slide, War, The Water Baby, The Whale Tooth, When Alice Told Her Soul, When God Laughs, When the World Was Young, Where the Trail Forks, Which Make Men Remember, White and Yellow, The White Man’s Way, The White Silence, Who Believes in Ghosts!, Whose Business is To Live, A Wicked Woman, The Wife of a King, Winged Blackmail, The Wisdom of the Trail, The Wit of Porportuk, Wonder of Woman, Yah! Yah! Yah!, Yellow Handkerchief

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The Poetical Works of Jack London

London, Jack 2015

Jack London was an American author, journalist, and social activist. A pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction, he was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone.

Some of his most famous works include The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories ”To Build a Fire”, ”An Odyssey of the North”, and ”Love of Life”. He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as ”The Pearls of Parlay” and ”The Heathen”, and of the San Francisco Bay area in The Sea Wolf.

London was part of the radical literary group, ”The Crowd”, in San Francisco, and a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers. He wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics, such as his dystopian novel The Iron Heel, his non-fiction exposé The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

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Brown Wolf and Other Jack London Stories

London, Jack 2016
BROWN WOLF and Other JACK LONDON Stories (Fine Print Edition) - Publication date: 1920 Read More

The House of Pride

London, Jack 2016

I am very fond of sport, and delight in boxing, fencing, swimming, riding, yachting, and even kite-flying. Although primarily of the city, I like to be near it rather than in it. The country, though, is the best, the only natural life. In my grown-up years the writers who have influenced me most are Karl Marx in a particular, and Spencer in a general, way.

In the days of my barren boyhood, if I had had a chance, I would have gone in for music; now, in what are more genuinely the days of my youth, if I had a million or two I would devote myself to writing poetry and pamphlets. I think the best work I have done is in the "League of the Old Men," and parts of "The Kempton-Wace Letters.

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Tales of the Klondyke

Jack London 2016

*This book is Annotated (It contains a biography of the Author).* As a young man in the summer of 1897, Jack London joined the Klondike gold rush. From that seminal experience emerged these gripping, inimitable wilderness tales, which have endured as some of London’s best and most defining work.

With remarkable insight and unflinching realism, London describes the punishing adversity that awaited men in the brutal, frozen expanses of the Yukon, and the extreme tactics these adventurers and travelers adopted to survive. Contents: The god of his fathers -- The great interrogation -- Which make men remember -- Siwash -- The man with the gash -- Jan, the unrepentant -- Grit of women -- Where the trail forks -- A daughter of the aurora -- At the rainbow's end -- The scorn of women.

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Jack London - The Science Fiction Stories - Volume 2

London, Jack 2017

John Griffith "Jack" London was born John Griffith Chaney on January 12th, 1876 in San Francisco. His father, William Chaney, was living with his mother Flora Wellman when she became pregnant. Chaney insisted she have an abortion. Flora's response was to turn a gun on herself.

Although her wounds were not severe the trauma made her temporarily deranged. In late 1876 his mother married John London and the young child was brought to live with them as they moved around the Bay area, eventually settling in Oakland where Jack completed grade school.

Jack also worked hard at several jobs, sometimes 12-18 hours a day, but his dream was university. He was lent money for that and after intense studying enrolled in the summer of 1896 at the University of California in Berkeley. In 1897, at 21 , Jack searched out newspaper accounts of his mother's suicide attempt and the name of his biological father.

He wrote to William Chaney, then living in Chicago. Chaney said he could not be London's father because he was impotent; and casually asserted that London's mother had relations with other men. Jack, devastated by the response, quit Berkeley and went to the Klondike.

Though equally because of his continuing dire finances Jack might have taken that as the excuse he needed to leave. In the Klondike Jack began to gather material for his writing but also accumulated many health problems, including scurvy, hip and leg problems many of which he then carried for life.

By the late 1890's Jack was regularly publishing short stories and by the turn of the century full blown novels. By 1904 Jack had married, fathered two children and was now in the process of divorcing. A stint as a reporter on the Russo-Japanese war of 1904 was equal amounts trouble and experience.

But that experience was always put to good use in a remarkable output of work. Twelve years later Jack had amassed a wealth of writings many of which remain world classics. He had a reputation as a social activist and a tireless friend of the workers.

And yet on November 22nd 1916 Jack London died in a cottage on his ranch at the age of only 40. Here we present The Science Fiction Stories - Volume 2.

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Jack London Dog Stories

London, Jack 2019

A nice illustrated unabridged collection of two of Jack London's most popular books - The Call of the Wild and White Fang. The text and illustrations are from the first editions published in 1903 and 1906. The cover is from a 1923 poster for the movie The Call of the Wild.

The book contains 24 original illustrations.The Call of the Wild is Jack London's best known book. It follows Buck, a huge Saint Bernard, as he is kidnapped from his comfortable life in California and transported to the Klondike Gold Rush. His abductors sell him to be used as a sled dog for the miners in the North.

He slowly discovers his ancient root as his civilized upbringing is slowly eroded by the harsh realities of life on the trail. London drew upon his experience in the Yukon to produce a realistic adventure.White Fang is set during the Klondike Gold Rush in the Yukon Territory, London's 1906 story chronicles the story of a half-dog, half-wolf beast in the wild.

As opposed to his famous Call of the Wild tale of a domestic dog reverting to the wild, White Fang depicts a wild animal eventually becoming domesticated. It is a gripping tale told from the wolf's point of view about the hard life in the frozen wilds of the north.

The story concludes with White Fang returning to civilization.

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Jack London's Stories for Boys

London, Jack 2020
Jack London's stories for boys. Read More

And that's the end of the complete list! Now that you have it - the next step for you is to of course purchase them and dive into reading Jack London books. Worry not, we've done the tedious job for you and added amazon direct book links including AudioBook, Kindle, Paperback and Hardcover versions as applicable.

Happy reading!


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